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. this must be fixed. this is a problem that even former president george w. bush was concerned about in his first address to a joint congress. >> earlier today i asked john ashcroft, the attorney general, to develop specific recommendations to end racial profiling. it's wrong and we will end it in america. in so doing we will not hinder the work of our nation's brave police officers. they protect us every day. often at great risk. but by stopping -- [ applause ] but by stopping the abuses of a few, we will add to the public confidence our police officers earn and deserve. >> heeding the president's call for action, michigan congressman john conyers helped sponsor the end racial profiling act back in 2001. the act, though, never made it out of committee. for vote on the house floor. since 2001, congressman conyers has been reintroducing the same bill each and every year. and each and every year, the same thing happens. here he is earlier this week. >> i want to make one thing clear. we were working on the reintroduction before the trayvon martin tragedy. and the george zimmerman acquittal. s
of the -- you could -- does the ghost of tony blair and george w. bush and saddam hussein hung heavily over parliament? >> absolutely. in all the -- not just skepticism, almost cynicism about the what the government says about the intelligence was the back drop. it's larger than that. i think something has been going on for years, if not decades in europe, gradual weakening of commitment to defense, preoccupation of -- >> what do you make of o-- ow hm france saying we need a political solution. i would love france to come forward with this magic political solution. this is like richard nixon's secret plan to end vietnam in 1968. there's not one. >> exactly. there's not going to be a political solution to syria. syria sill in the relatively early phases over a prolonged civil war. what's interesting about britain, a country that distanced itself from europe over economic issues and now distancing itself from the united states over strategic issues. this is small britain, small europe. we've ended the era -- >> why is that? how does europe find itself in a position or britain where it's separ
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
they did? george h.w. bush, because about 20 years later, a woman showed up to one of his rallies with a pistol in her purse, and they were doing something they had done for the last 20 years that they had not done the 200 years before then. they were checking purses, too, and they found that. then you say to yourself, maybe what we need, maybe what we need is a racial squeaky fromm, and you start searching through the history books, you find out we had one.in 1901. raise your hand if you remember who was president before theodore roosevelt. no one remembered.a few guys, thank you. put those guys on "jeopardy!" most people forget when roosevelt came into the administration he was vice president and was somewhat who is this guy, this showboat guy from -- fighting wars in cuba. hat elevated him was that he was a very popular vice president for a popular president. it was mckinley.he was killed just after he was reelected. he was at a pan-american exposition, a world's fair in new york state. president mckinley was working the rope line, and a man standing at point blank range at the
is related to the polks and she used their dinner service while her and george bush was in the office. is that true? >> i don't know. good question. >> as our series progresses, as we get it barbara bush, we'll answer that question for you. we'll go back in time and learn about how that political partnership came together. you told us sarah polk was from a wealthy family in tennessee. how did she and james polk meet? >> they ran in the same circles. probably through -- either through andrew jackson or through her own father's family. polk went to the -- graduated from the university of north carolina and then went into law and studied in nashville and became clerk of the legislature and they met there or they met at andrew jackson's because the polk girls were often at the jackson's home. certainly jackson is known or we think that he advised polk to marry her. this is who you need as a wife, he would say. and then it is commonly said that she told polk she wouldn't marry him unless he ran for office but and of course he did and he won and they were married in 1824. >> so andrew jacks
president george h w bush, defense secretary sounded a lot like president obama. in an interview with the post, aspen said what we are doing is sending a message against the people who were responsible for planning this operation. if anybody asks the same people to do it again, they will remember this message. and experts say this isn't about sending a message to syria at all. but to another american enemy right next door. >> it really is about the president's credibility when dealing with other countries. specifically iran. he has told iran that all options are on the table, including military options. to prevent them from gaining a nuclear weapon. if he lets it go in syria, the threat in iran is weakened. experts kept coming back with why now, when president obam ha has so clearly stated this is a red line. paul, thank you very much. it would seem after listening to those reports that if there was a plan, it has gone terribly wrong. what change was done before the sort of turn tide and began to talk about an attack. >> i think that spoke to their closest allies and i think perh
don't expect them to speak, although former president george w. bush was invited but he had to decline because he's still recovering from the heart procedure he had earlier this month. dave? >> thank you. >>> well, the city of san francisco is launching a new program to target kids who often miss school without explanation. district attorney george gascon says this is to keep children from winding up in the system. >> if you look at most of our social and economic problems in our city today, they are directly related to a lack or formal education. >> the d.a.'s office is providing $130,000 for programs to prevent truancy at -- to schools. they are idab. wells and burton schools. >>> more kids are heading back to school. so watch out for them. some districts back in session are fremont, walnut creek, berkeley, dublin. you can get a complete list of the dates at ktvu.com. look for the back 2 school icon on the home page. >>> u.s. government agencies made 11,000 -- between 11,000 and 12,000 data requests. facebook supplied information in 79% of the cases saying they were obligated by law
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
to talk about the cause of this and we took a little bit of heat from the george w. bush campaign is for not being prepared to wage traditional conflict due to the task force is. this would be the most likely vehicle also in the professional military education sphere. the peacekeeping stabilization operation institute and the u.s. army war college in the national defense immigration will continue to be part of this is expertise onto which we can draw. but i do expect good compared to matters. one case study talks about how it took more care can work anywhere. >> we have about six people so far and maybe a few others to try to fit you all in. >> hello, my name is piers martin and i'm here at the georgetown university. my question is related to one of the main ideas which is to broaden our positions and a conflict that was one of the first reactions from the united states is reaction and the european union started. working and building of institutions for common security and defense policy. as there seems to be quite a change of discussion right now because the discussions we are ha
because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. by me, i've worked every day trying to do things. that i'm convinced the only way we do that is the states exert their tenth amendment authority and start reassessing -- [applause] changes to the constitution that restore federalism and a constitutional republic. and so i think that's the way. you are frustrated. you ought to see me in washington. asked by staff. i want people -- ask my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see it into things. one is, i see the constitution and i see what's happening to it. a
the administration you work for and what you're responsible for. >> so i served under both terms of the george w. bush administration. was actually appointed by the transportation secretary norman mineta. as you may know, mr. mineta is a democrat served in the republican administration and r authoring and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency at the u.s. d.o.t. oversees a million daily shipments of has does materials by all modes of transportation, air, land, truck, sea, vessel. and even pipeline. >> so your current work with united transportation advisers, what is that? >> a consulting firm. i'm a lawyer, have a law practice and consulting practice. so we talk infrastructure projects, we talk transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> so one of y clients key stone xl? not. >> anybody supporting nosir. >> so as far as key stone xl is concerned, the position that you are taking through the advisers or anyone else, where do you stand on it or if it should be built? >> i've been monitoring this for several years
expansion. under george w. bush we expanded the prescription drug part d. i opposed that. i opposed it because there was not a governmental plan available. i thought we should -- there was not universal pricing which i thought would bring down the costs dramatically. i think i'm right about both of those points, by the way. but the day after it was passed, i worked to make sure it was implemented as best we could. we worked together to make it work. and we're not seeing that on the affordable care act. we're seeing almost just a political isolation of this issue just calling it politics rather than trying to make it work the best that you can and seeking changes that you think should be changed. so i'm hoping that we can get to that point, and we can get the resources necessary to make sure this law is implemented fairly. because you're absolutely correct. it's not going to be a one-year implementation of the personal mandate. it's going to take a long time. it's going to take years. we know that. we also don't know what type of group will enroll in the first year. it might surprise
the george w. bush administration and was part of the council of economic advisers. specimen so much for being here today. special thanks to mohammed el- erian and mr. taylor for flying from california. i went to kick off the panel with you. coined the term, the new normal in 2009. your outlook for the economy has been dead on. how much longer is this economy going to remain in the new normal? me take you back to 2009 when the new normal concept came out. the idea was to signal that it would not be your traditional cyclical recovery. unless the mindset in washington changed, and there was a better understanding of the underlying dynamics, we risked getting stuck. in a keyword of unusually sluggish clerk -- growth, high on implement, that is when it materialized. concept of the economy stuck in second gear. let me push this analogy. it is not just stuck in second gear, it is being driven on a foggy road. there is some good news. we are doing better than others. europe was in reverse and just went to neutral. japan has been neutral for a long time and just jumps to first gear. we are d
for and what you were responsible for. >> guest: i served under but george w. bush administration and was appointed by the transportation secretary norman. and as you may know, he is a democrat who served in the republican administration and he was responsible for offering and then congress passed a reorganization act that led to the creation of this agency. and this agency fmsa receives a million daily shipments of hazardous air, land, truck, and sea, dessel and pipeline. >> host: you're current work with the national transportation advisers, what is that? >> guest: i am a lawyer by training and we also have a consulting practice. so, we talk infrastructure projects, transportation projects to both public and private sector clients. >> host: is one of your clients keystone xl? is anybody supporting trans canada? >> guest: no, sir. >> host: as far as keystone xl is concerned, the decision that you were taking, where do you stand if it shouldn't be built on the extension we've been talking about? >> guest: i've been monitoring this for several years. when i was at the d.o.t. the or
, boom, we saved george h.w. bush. race among we are stuck. we knew 100 years before the while thers, police let john mohammed go at least nine times, that racial profiles are problematic. question is, what can we do about it? weneed to keep doing what have just done in new york city where we passed the community what is a, because failure or for national security is a failure for neighborhood security. we need to focus on people's behavior, not on their race. ed last summer said derisively's officer working a neighborhood and he had a black and latino neighborhood and he had a suspect description of a race sucked -- rape suspect. he came across four young ladies sitting on a stoop, and said, have you seen this guy? no.soaid, they then stopped and frisked then. law enforcement is not that different from anything else. if you do one thing, you're not doing something else, so you better be doing the right thing. if you are searching for a rape suspect and you decide to stop and check if these for girls have a joint in their pocket, you are no longer looking for the rape suspect. that i
terrorism was partially because george w. bush hated in the muslim world. despite his speech in cairo, despite his efforts to close guantanamo, despite his elimination of the use of the term war on terror, al qaeda continues to hate america. and even as i speak to you here today, they continue to plan attacks against america here and around the world. the president's not alone in failing to confront these threats. i'm afraid because of the success we've had in preventing another attack on the scale of 9/11, some of our leaders in both parties have been lulled into a sense of false security. i certainly support the privacy rights and expectations of all americans. but my colleagues, i also know for a fact that the surveillance programs that our government used have prevented attacks and saved american lives. i think it's a mistake to dismiss privacy concerns as crazy. after all, we have a government whose tax collecting agency targeted americans because of their political views. but it's also a mistake to exaggerate them. after all, if a known terrorist is e-mailing or calling someone
like, why the indonesian military shoot our church? they appeal to president george h.w. bush, and appealed to the eun, and marched through the streets, retracing the steps of the funeral two weeks before. some putting their hands up in the v sign-chanting, viva east timor, viva independence, incredibly brave. and i that marched from schools and home and march to the santa cruz cemetery. when we got there we were interviewing people. why are you risking your life to do this? and they would say, for my mother. for my father. for my village. it was wiped out. and then from the direction the procession has come we saw hundreds of indonesian soldiers carrying their u.s. m-16s at the ready position marching up on the crowd. 90% of the weapons used were from the united states. the army was armed, trained and financed be the united states. and in this day it was no different. the soldiers marched up ten to 12 abreast. alan and i were interviewing people in the middle of the crowd. and allen suggest we walk to the front of the crowd, because we knew that the indonesian military commit
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17